Scottish Memories- Fort William to Inverness

This is another look back to a post from my early blogging days. On this day in 2014, I posted the third in a series of posts about our visit to Scotland in 1990. I have edited it slightly but it more or less as I wrote it at the time. I don’t think it is likely that I will ever visit the UK again but when I dream of places I would like to see again Scotland is always one of them.


This is the last post about our trip to Scotland in 1990. We were only there a week. How I wish we’d had longer. I guess that’s why I’m so attracted to television programs and films set in Scotland. Not “Braveheart” though. Too bloodthirsty. I preferred “Local Hero”. On television I liked “Shetland”, “Hamish McBeth”, “Taggart” and “Takin’ Over the Asylum” (even before I’d ever heard of David Tennant).

Our train is delayed.
Our train is delayed.

The last leg of our journey was partly based on “Confessions of a Train Spotter” an episode of  the BBC television series “Great Railway Journeys”. The narrator of this episode was Michael Palin and I sometimes wonder if it was this program that started him on his career as a globetrotting documentary maker. In this episode he travelled from London to the west coast of Scotland by train ending his journey at Kyle of Localsh. We loved the scenery so much that when we planned our trip we decided that we wanted to see the West Highland line and Kyle of Localsh too.

Fort William

Loch Linnhe near Fort William

By Nilfanion (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

First we travelled from Glasgow to Fort William which is on the shore of Loch Linnhe, a large sea loch on the west coast. That journey was very scenic and we didn’t even mind the signal failure that delayed us en route. Our “Let’s Go” guide book described Fort William as being a climbing centre for nearby Ben Nevis and rather a boring town but we really liked it. One day while we waiting at the railway station  I saw a railway cleaner washing a carriage on the platform . Cleaning trains was my job in Adelaide at the time and I often did exactly the same job myself. I remember thinking that it would be nice if I could exchange jobs with that person for a while and stay in Fort William for longer.

We had been staying in youth hostels for a couple of weeks so in Fort William we treated ourselves to a bed and breakfast place. There were a few other guests who we met at breakfast the next day. A lady who had just returned from a trip on a sail training vessel which we saw in the loch later and another Australian couple who were a bit younger than us. I’m sure most people know about the concept of “Six degrees of separation”. Well we had that experience. We chatted to this young couple and it turned out that they were from South Australia like us and they lived in a nearby suburb. But the best part of the story happened more than a year later back in Australia. One day when David was on the train home from work, he met the guy who we’d met in Fort William and discovered that he and his wife had moved to our suburb. What are the odds of that?

Loch Linnhe at Fort William.
Loch Linnhe at Fort William.
Sail training ship on Loch Linnhe
Sail training ship on Loch Linnhe

At Fort William we had haggis for the first time; we liked it. We had plunger coffee for the first time at the cafe in the Mountain Shop which probably started our coffee addiction.  We had a huge pot of it for a Scottish “poond”. We walked 3 miles from the town to the beginning of the path to Ben Nevis.  Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in Scotland at 1344m (4,406 ft). We had no intention of climbing the mountain although many do, we knew our limitations even in those days. The photo that David took of me at Glen Nevis is one of my favourites and that day was one of the best of our entire trip for me.

Near Ben Nevis
Near Ben Nevis
On the slopes of Ben Nevis pretending to be a mountain climber.
On the slopes of Ben Nevis pretending to be a mountain climber.

We also went on a bus tour to Glen Coe scene of the infamous massacre of the McDonald Clan by the Campbell’s. Our guide, if I remember correctly, said that the historical facts of the massacre were not quite the same as popular history suggests. Of course he may have been a Campbell himself ! However there has certainly been a lot written on the subject, some of it factual and some not so much. I did have to agree with our guide that the scenery alone is worth going there for whatever the truth of what happened is.

The West Highland Railway

Another highlight was the train journey from Fort William to Mallaig on the West Highland line. In summer you can ride a steam train on that route but we were too early in the season. However it didn’t matter. It was another day of beautiful views and impressive railway engineering. In particular the fabulous Glen Finnan Viaduct. You can’t actually appreciate how amazing this is when you are on it as well as you can in this photograph.

Glenfinnan Viaduct.jpg
Glenfinnan Viaduct” by de:Benutzer:Nicolas17 – Self-photographed. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

Mallaig is a fishing port and we enjoyed wandering around the town for a few hours. The fishing boats were very picturesque. I would have liked to have taken a ferry to Skye from there. It’s certainly a place I would love to visit again.

Fishing boats at Mallaig
Fishing boats at Mallaig
Fishing Boats at Mallaig
Fishing Boats at Mallaig

Kyle of Localsh

Our journey to Kyle of Localsh from Fort William was an anti climax in some ways as we had to take a bus, a very crowded bus, which we were obliged to stand up on for most of the journey. As I am short that meant that I was not able to see very much of the scenery.

At that time there was no bridge to connect the town with the Isle of Skye so we took the short ferry trip across to Kyleakin, so that we could say that we had been “Over the sea to Skye”. The bridge was opened in 1995 and it is now free to use, initially it charged a toll which became a contentious issue for local people, so much so that many refused to pay it. The toll was removed in 2004. We took a photograph of the Kyle of Localsh Station sign but unlike Michael Palin we didn’t take a replica home with us. Nor did we sample the variety of malt whiskies served at the nearby Localsh Hotel. Instead we continued our journey by train on another scenic route, the line to Inverness.

Kyle of Localsh Station
Kyle of Localsh Station

Wick

At Inverness we stayed at a small hotel popular with rail enthusiasts. I had found the address in one of David’s rail magazines. They were happy to leave breakfast supplies outside our door when we chose to go out early in the morning on a day trip to Wick. We were a bit surprised that they left toast though. I hadn’t realised that in parts of the UK people ate cold toast.

Wick and Thurso are as far as you can go by train in the UK. We chose Wick as our destination for a day outing. Wick is a fishing port and once again I was captivated by the fishing boats. Wick was originally a Viking settlement and it would have been interesting to spend more time exploring the area which has ruins, walks and wildlife to see. I think a car would have been handy up here though.

Fishing boat at Wick
Fishing boat at Wick
Fishing boat at Wick
Fishing boat at Wick

Loch Ness

We couldn’t leave Inverness without travelling to nearby Loch Ness. We took a local bus to visit the ruins of Urquhart Castle. We also visited a local museum which had a lot of information about the loch and the various expeditions that had been made to try to find the elusive Loch Ness Monster. I have to say that on the day that we were there we didn’t see anything out of the ordinary. There have been a lot of hoaxes over the years and I think that I would be sorry in a way if scientists were able to prove or disprove that there was a creature living in Loch Ness. The mystery of it is part of the attraction. Either way tourist operators and businesses in the region have done well out of “Nessie”. 

We watched the movie “Loch Ness”  released in 1996 which starred Ted Danson. It wasn’t a brilliant movie, we watched it for the scenery really, but we did like the ending where Nessie is left in peace. I thought the castle ruins were very atmospheric and I liked hearing the piper who was playing there the day we visited.

Ruins of Urquhart Castle at Loch Ness
Ruins of Urquhart Castle at Loch Ness
Urquhart Castle ruins
The ruins of Urquhart Castle from above
The Piper
Piper at Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness

We left Inverness finally and took the train all the way back to London and then on to Bexhill-on-Sea to spend Easter before travelling around southern England and North Wales. As you can tell from how much I have written twenty-five years have not made me forget how much I loved being in Scotland and I’d go again in a heartbeat if I could.

 

Further Reading:

http://www.electricscotland.com/books/paterson/glencoe.htm – The Massacre at Glencoe

http://www.seat61.com/WestHighlandLine.htm#Fort%20William%20to%20Mallaig – The Man in Seat 61 blog

http://www.lochalsh.co.uk/skye_bridge.shtml – Skye Bridge story

http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/index.htm

Scotland Part Three – Fort William to Inverness

This is the last post about our trip to Scotland in 1990. We were only there a week. How I wish we’d had longer. I guess that’s why I’m so attracted to television programs and films set in Scotland. Not “Braveheart” though. Too bloodthirsty. I preferred “Local Hero”. On television I liked “Shetland”, “Hamish McBeth”, “Taggart” and “Takin’ Over the Asylum” (even before I’d ever heard of David Tennant).

Our train is delayed.
Our train is delayed.

The last leg of our journey was partly based on “Confessions of a Train Spotter” an episode of  the BBC television series “Great Railway Journeys”. The narrator of this episode was Michael Palin and I sometimes wonder if it was this program that started him on his career as a globetrotting documentary maker. In this episode he travelled from London to the west coast of Scotland by train ending his journey at Kyle of Localsh. We loved the scenery so much that when we planned our trip we decided that we wanted to see the West Highland line and Kyle of Localsh too.

Fort William

Loch Linnhe near Fort William

By Nilfanion (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

First we travelled from Glasgow to Fort William which is on the shore of Loch Linnhe, a large sea loch on the west coast. That journey was very scenic and we didn’t even mind the signal failure that delayed us en route. Our “Let’s Go” guide book described Fort William as being a climbing centre for nearby Ben Nevis and rather a boring town but we really liked it. One day while we waiting at the railway station in a light rain  I saw a railway cleaner washing a carriage on the platform . Cleaning trains was my job in Adelaide at the time and I remember thinking that it would be nice if I could exchange jobs with that person for a while and stay in Fort William for longer.

We had been staying in youth hostels for a couple of weeks so in Fort William we treated ourselves to a bed and breakfast place. There were a few other guests who we met at breakfast the next day. A lady who had just returned from a trip on a sail training vessel which we saw in the loch later and an Australian couple a bit younger than we were. I’m sure most people know about the concept of “Six degrees of separation”. Well this actually happened to us. We chatted to this young couple and it turned out that they were from South Australia like us and they lived in a nearby suburb. But the best part of the story happened more than a year later back in Australia. One day when Hubby was on the train home from work, he met the young man who we’d met in Fort William and discovered that he and his wife had moved to our suburb. What are the odds of that?

Loch Linnhe at Fort William.
Loch Linnhe at Fort William.

Sail training ship on Loch Linnhe
Sail training ship on Loch Linnhe

At Fort William we had haggis for the first time; we liked it. We had plunger coffee for the first time at the cafe in the Mountain Shop which probably started our coffee addiction.  We walked 3 miles from the town to the beginning of the path to Ben Nevis.  Ben Nevis is the highest mountain in Scotland at 1344m (4,406 ft). We had no intention of climbing the mountain although many do, we knew our limitations even in those days. The photo Hubby took of me at Glen Nevis is one of my favourites and that day was one of the best of our entire trip for me.

Near Ben Nevis
Near Ben Nevis

On the slopes of Ben Nevis pretending to be a mountain climber.
On the slopes of Ben Nevis pretending to be a mountain climber.

We also went on a bus tour to Glen Coe scene of the infamous massacre of the McDonald Clan by the Campbell’s. Our guide, if I remember correctly, said that the historical facts of the massacre were not quite the same as popular history suggests. Of course he may have been a Campbell himself ! However there has certainly been a lot written on the subject and no doubt it was as much about politics than it was about clan rivalries. I did have to agree with our guide that the scenery alone is worth going there for whatever the truth of what happened is.

The West Highland Railway

Another highlight was the train journey from Fort William to Mallaig on the West Highland line. In summer you can ride a steam train on that route but we were too early in the season. However it didn’t matter. It was another day of beautiful views and impressive railway engineering. In particular the fabulous Glen Finnan Viaduct. You can’t actually appreciate how amazing this is when you are on it as well as you can in this photograph.

Glenfinnan Viaduct.jpg
Glenfinnan Viaduct” by de:Benutzer:Nicolas17 – Self-photographed. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

Mallaig is a fishing port and we enjoyed wandering around the town for a few hours. The fishing boats were very picturesque. I would have liked to have taken a ferry to Skye from there. It’s certainly a place I would love to visit again.

Fishing boats at Mallaig
Fishing boats at Mallaig

Fishing Boats at Mallaig
Fishing Boats at Mallaig

Kyle of Localsh

Our journey to Kyle of Localsh was an anti climax in some ways as we had to take a bus, a very crowded bus which we were obliged to stand up on for most of the journey. At that time there was no bridge to connect the town with the Isle of Skye so we took the short ferry trip across to Kyleakin, so that we could say that we had been “Over the sea to Skye”. The bridge was opened in 1995 and it is now free to use, initially it charged a toll which became a contentious issue for local people, so much so that many refused to pay it. The toll was removed in 2004. We took a photograph of the Kyle of Localsh Station sign but unlike Michael Palin we didn’t take a replica home with us. Nor did we sample the variety of malt whiskies served at the nearby Localsh Hotel. Instead we continued our journey by train on another scenic route, the line to Inverness.

Kyle of Localsh Station
Kyle of Localsh Station

Wick

At Inverness we stayed at a small hotel popular with rail enthusiasts. They were happy to leave breakfast supplies outside our door when we chose to go out early in the morning on a day trip to Wick. We were a bit surprised that they left toast though. I hadn’t realised that in parts of the UK people ate cold toast.

Wick and Thurso are as far as you can go by train in the UK. We chose Wick as our destination for a day outing. Wick is a fishing port and once again I was captivated by the fishing boats. Wick was originally a Viking settlement and it would have been interesting to spend more time exploring the area which has ruins, walks and wildlife to see. I think a car would have been handy up here though.

Fishing boat at Wick
Fishing boat at Wick

Fishing boat at Wick
Fishing boat at Wick

Loch Ness

We couldn’t leave Inverness without travelling to nearby Loch Ness. We took a local bus to visit the ruins of Urquhart Castle. We also visited a local museum which had a lot of information about the loch and the various expeditions that had been made to try to find the elusive Loch Ness Monster. I have to say that on the day that we were there we didn’t see anything out of the ordinary. There have been a lot of hoaxes over the years and I think that I would be sorry in a way if scientists were able to prove or disprove that there was a creature living in Loch Ness. The mystery of it is part of the attraction. Either way tourist operators and businesses in the region have done well out of “Nessie”.  We watched the movie “Loch Ness”  released in 1996 which starred Ted Danson. It wasn’t a brilliant movie, we watched it for the scenery really, but we did like the ending where Nessie is left in peace. I thought the castle ruins were very atmospheric and I liked hearing the piper who was playing there the day we visited.

Ruins of Urquhart Castle at Loch Ness
Ruins of Urquhart Castle at Loch Ness

Urquhart Castle ruins
The ruins of Urquhart Castle from above

The Piper
Piper at Urquhart Castle, Loch Ness

We left Inverness finally and took the train all the way back to London and then on to Bexhill-on-Sea to spend Easter before travelling around southern England and North Wales. As you can tell from how much I have written twenty-five years have not made me forget how much I loved being in Scotland and I’d go again in a heartbeat if I could.

 

Further Reading:

http://www.electricscotland.com/books/paterson/glencoe.htm – The Massacre at Glencoe

http://www.seat61.com/WestHighlandLine.htm#Fort%20William%20to%20Mallaig – The Man in Seat 61 blog

http://www.lochalsh.co.uk/skye_bridge.shtml – Skye Bridge story

http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk/index.htm

Scotland – Part Two

Stirling

Scotland has cropped up on both my blogs quite frequently over the past week or two. First it was the referendum that made me start thinking a lot about our visit in 1990 and inspired me to scan and post some of the photos we took there.We now know that Scotland will remain a part of the United Kingdom; at least for now. I think that the referendum was a good thing though and I’m very impressed with the number of people who registered to vote and with the high turn out given that voting is not compulsory the way it is here in Australia.

Scotland has been cropping up on a lot of television programs I’ve been watching too. I like to watch “Coast” on the History Channel and there always seems to be at least one Scottish destination, re-runs of “Time Team” have featured locations in Scotland and I recently watched a  new series on one of our pay TV channels called “Shetland” which I really liked.

I posted a photo of two dolls in kilts on my doll blog that week too and told the story of how they came into my possession. A comment from a reader gave me the incentive to try to fix the dolls up as their clothes had seen better days and later I did a post about that too. Then I went to a cricket match where I saw Tasmania play Scotland in a World Cup warm up match.

Today I’m posting a few more of the photos taken in 1990.

Argyll's Lodging, Castle Wynd, Stirling
Argyll Lodgings, Stirling by Kim Traynor (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
I really did like Stirling as I mentioned last time. I was looking up some visitor guides online after writing that piece and I discovered that the building that was a Youth Hostel when we stayed there is now a museum called Argyll’s Lodgings. It is a Renaissance townhouse from the 17th century. It has been restored fully since it’s hostel days and visitors can see it as part of their Stirling Castle tour or eat in one of its grand dining rooms which are used for functions. I remember it as being old, cold and having lots of stairs but we thought it was very cool to stay in a 300 year old building so we didn’t mind. It was two minutes walk to the castle too so it was a very convenient place to stay.

I took the photo below one evening as we walked back to the hostel after a day out. It was taken in Castle Wynd, the street that leads to the castle.

Castle Wynd, Stirling
Castle Wynd, Stirling

Statue of Robert the Bruce on the esplanade of Stirling Castle
Statue of Robert the Bruce on the esplanade of Stirling Castle

The other place that I remember visiting in Stirling was Cambuskenneth Abbey which was a 12th century Augustinian Abbey founded by King David I of Scotland. It fell into ruins after the Reformation in 1560. King James III of Scotland and his wife Queen Margaret of Denmark who was the daughter of King Christian I are buried there. You can read more about the reign of King James III here. The bell tower of the abbey is still standing and we both climbed to the top; something that we would not be able to do today. The stairs were old worn and twisted. There was a rope hanging down to hold on to as you climbed up. I was very nervous but really wanted to see the view from the top.

Ruins of Cambuskenneth Abbey.
Ruins of Cambuskenneth Abbey.

The bell tower of Cambuskenneth Abbey
The bell tower of Cambuskenneth Abbey

CambuskennethGrave.jpg
CambuskennethGrave” by Original uploader was Adtrace at en.wikipedia – Originally from en.wikipedia; description page is/was here.. Licensed under CC BY 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons.

We left Stirling and headed for Glasgow but we only stayed one night as we had accommodation booked in Fort William. One day I would love to go back and see Glasgow.  I’ll write about the last leg of our Scottish journey another time.

Photo Credits-except where mentioned the photos were taken either by Hubby or me. It’s a bit hard now to remember who took what. The one of the ruins I think is one of Hubby’s as it looks like me in the distance.

Only 136 days to the Cricket World Cup

Yes, that’s right, the football season is over and it’s time to start thinking about cricket again.

This week Tasmania is playing host to the Scottish cricket team who are playing two matches against the Tasmanian Tigers. I decided to go along to the first game today.

The match was played at Kingston Twin Ovals which is part of a large sports complex at Kingston, about 11km from Hobart. I had never been there before so I was interested to see it. It is a fairly new complex and has hosted local AFL football matches and soccer as well as cricket I believe. I thought that the backdrop of gum trees and the view of the Derwent Estuary in the distance made it quite an attractive ground. The groundskeeper had obviously gone to a lot of trouble for the visitors too.

Scotland v Tasmania

Scotland v Tasmania

It was a bright sunny day today although the fresh breeze made it a tad uncomfortable outdoors. Although there was a sign saying that admission prices were $8 & $5 I didn’t see anyone collecting money when I arrived at 10:15 am. The match had begun at 9:30 am but I didn’t want to drag Hubby 50km to take me so I got a bus. Most people had parked their cars near the oval and were sitting in them out of the wind or on the grassy slopes and didn’t have to pay anything. At first there were only a few people there but as the day went on more arrived. It is school holiday time in Tasmania so there were a number of youths and men with and without small children. I did spot a few women as well once the weather improved. Most had come to support the local team but I did see one car sporting the Saltire and one fan in a tartan hat.

Flying the flag for Scotland
Flying the flag for Scotland

Scotland v Tasmania

It was not at all like a big international cricket match but more like some of the domestic matches I’ve watched at Bellerive Oval. It was very quiet with no music or ground announcements and you could actually hear the players encourage each other or give instructions to the hard-working men pushing the sight screen to and fro. Most of the chit-chat I hear at cricket matches is unintelligible to me but funnily enough whatever language it is in it sounds more or less the same.

There were a few delays during the match due to the reflections from car windscreens annoying the players and the sight screen men were kept busy asking patrons to move their cars until they got hold of some bunting to rope off the offending area. Another delay was caused by one of the Tasmanian batsmen hitting a six over the fence on the far side of the ground. It is hilly around Kingston and I think the ball ran out of the ground and down a slope. Two Scottish players had to jump the fence and go and find it which luckily they did or there would have been another delay while a new ball was chosen.

I would have liked to have stayed for the whole game but as the first innings was not completed until 1:30pm I thought that I had better leave then as I would have no hope of seeing the end of the match due to the bus timetable. My main purpose in going there had been to see and  photograph the Scotland team and as they bowled first I was able to do that. Tasmania was on 4/304 at the end of their innings and I felt that Scotland would have a hard time catching them. There were a lot of boundaries being hit. Ed Cowan made 104 for the Tasmanian Tigers which was good to see. I checked the match report later and Tasmania won by 186 runs. You can read the match report here. A lot of the regular team members are away playing for the Hobart Hurricanes at the Champions Trophy so I thought that we did very well.
Scotland v Tasmania
I haven’t learned the names of all the Scottish players yet but today’s outing will mean I’m more familiar with them when they come back in March next year to play their World Cup match against Ireland. I’ve posted more cricket photos on my Flickr Photostream but here are a couple I liked.
Scotland v Tasmania
Scotland v Tasmania

 

Scotland v Tasmania game 1
Scotland v Tasmania game 1

Scotland -Part One

History is being made today as the Scottish people vote in a referendum to decide if they should remain part of the United Kingdom.

I’m not entirely sure how I feel about that.  Part of me is feeling sad that the old order of things might change after three hundred years but part of me is also going “Yay. Long Live Scotland”. If I were a Scot myself and living there I suspect that I might be a Scottish Nationalist but as I’m not and am far away in Australia I can only hope that it works out well for everyone concerned. It’s rather like Australia becoming a republic or Britain abolishing the monarchy.  I always find change hard to accept. I would really rather these things happened after I’m safely dead and buried.

I have always loved Scotland. I love the bagpipes, the first music I really enjoyed listening to as a child was a recording of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. Family stories claim that we have Scottish heritage on my maternal grandmother’s side; maybe that’s where I get that from.  I have only visited Scotland twice in my life, the first time was in 1977 and was just a day trip to Edinburgh so it hardly counts. The second time was in 1990 as part of our trip to the UK. Hubby and I had about a week there. We didn’t have a car, we travelled by train and stopped at Stirling, Glasgow, Fort William and Inverness before making the longest train journey of our UK trip back to London and then on to Bexhill in Sussex.

This afternoon I brought out an old photo album from our trip and started to scan all the Scottish photos. I haven’t finished yet and I have a feeling there are a couple of boxes of slides somewhere but it has been nice to see them again and to have the opportunity to tidy them up a bit with photo editing software. Eventually I hope to make a new album combining both the images from slides and prints.

Edinburgh Castle March 1990
Edinburgh Castle March 1990

We used YHA hostels a lot during our UK holiday and we had intended to stay at the one in Edinburgh but were not able to get in on the dates we wanted. The Warden at the Newcastle YHA where we were staying suggested that we try Stirling YHA instead. We did and it turned out to be one of the best decisions of our trip. It was easy to visit both Edinburgh and Glasgow from Stirling and the hostel at that time was in a very old building near Stirling Castle. We did the tour of the castle and decided that although Edinburgh Castle is spectacular we actually liked Stirling better.

Stirling Castle
Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle, it turns out, is the home of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Regimental Museum so perhaps it was meant to be.

It was March when we visited Scotland and occasionally the weather was not ideal for being outdoors. One day while we were visiting Edinburgh Castle there was a snowstorm which drove us indoors where as we waited for it to subside we learned far more than we ever expected to about St Margaret of Scotland, most of which I have since forgotten.  This is how the approaching storm looked from the castle walls.

Snowstorm Coming, Edinburgh Castle
Snowstorm Coming, Edinburgh Castle

We had better luck with the weather another day and were able to walk the Royal Mile past St Giles Cathedral and on to Holyrood Palace at the other end. The palace is of course the Queen’s official residence in Edinburgh and a grand place to visit. Next to it is the ruins of Holyrood Abbey.

Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh
Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh

Holyroodhouse Palace
Holyroodhouse Palace

After a few days we left Stirling and after a night in Glasgow we continued our journey by train to Fort William and the highlands. When I’ve scanned those photos in I’ll post a few of them too.

Photo Thursday – Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland

Statue of Robert the Bruce, Stirling Castle, Scotland March 1990
Statue of Robert the Bruce, Stirling Castle, Scotland March 1990

On the eve of the Scottish referendum today’s photo is of the statue of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland that stands on the esplanade of Stirling Castle.