30 Songs, 30 Days: (30)

Last One

I’ve been watching the Men’s Cricket World Cup over the past month and I may have watched a little too much cricket because this morning while I was at the Op Shop I suffered two earworms. First, it was the New Zealand National Anthem and then later the West Indies Cricket Anthem. I should explain for non-cricket following readers that the West Indies cricket team is a confederation of several Caribbean countries and as playing several anthems at the start of each of their matches would be somewhat impractical they have a special cricket song instead. The song I’m sharing today is not it though. Instead, I’m sharing “Dreadlock Holiday” by 10cc from 1978, back when I didn’t like cricket. This song came from an album called “Bloody Tourists”.

I have always had a soft spot for New Zealand and for some reason their anthem seems to me to be one of the most beautiful ones I’ve heard so I’m going to share a version of it with you to finish up. You may not understand most of the words but the girls have lovely voices.

Cee’s B&W Photo Challenge : Corners

Corners are interesting. What will you see or find as you turn a corner? They pose mystery and intrigue. If it’s a corner you know well then maybe you are expecting to see the same old things. I spend a lot of my time alone and I guess I walk around in a world of my own. In fact a fortune teller once told me that I live inside my own head. How well did  she pick me? I tend to miss things sometimes. However I have often looked up and seen someone I know or I noticed that something had changed from the last time I had passed that way. Familiar things come and go so it’s good to get some photos as a record of our time there. This reminds me of the song “We may never pass this way again.” by Seals and Crofts 1973. I visited some unfamiliar corners in New Zealand cities and I was indeed afraid I would never pass this way again so I took the photos below to record my time there. If I do go back I could find it all changed. I love to visit new places and make discoveries. I still look for new and exciting things beyond the next corner. I’m hoping these photos will compliment the beautiful photos of Hobart that Vanda has taken which are very familiar to her as she has spent a great deal of time in the city where I have been stuck here in Oatlands largely due to work commitments. Trips to Hobart are not always possible so I have not taken many photos there. There’s one for the bucket list!

GEDC1037GEDC1053New Zealand 1New Zealand 2New Zealand 5New Zealand 7New Zealand 8New Zealand 9

Our Final Port – Auckland

The last place we visited on our cruise was Auckland. Naomi had visited there for a day back in the 1980s when she cruised on the old P&O ship “Oriana” and she had liked it very much. At that time Auckland was a city with a population about the same as Adelaide where we lived at that time. Naomi remembers seeing intersections where you could cross the road diagonally so I am guessing that Auckland was a quieter city then

Now it is a bustling city, more high-rise than Wellington and with a vibe that reminded me of Sydney. Naomi said that there was little or nothing she remembered from her previous visit and certainly didn’t spot any diagonal street crossings. We did see people crossing diagonally but did not see the lines marked on the road. I googled to see if there were any surviving ones and learned the proper name for these crossings is Barnes Dance Crossings and that Auckland was the first city to introduce them in 1958. I have never seen one in Australia.

We were very lucky that the Auckland Overseas Passenger Terminal can accommodate large cruise ships although apparently when Ovation of the Seas calls there next summer she will not be able to berth there. It must be a problem for many port  cities with cruise ships getting so large.

We arrived early to find that we had a neighbour, at an adjoining pier was “Diamond Princess”. It was nice to disembark from the ship and be able to walk straight into the city centre. What was the first thing we did? We caught a ferry of course. As we did in Sydney we wanted to photograph and film the harbour from the water and we also wanted to see what the Auckland ferries were like. We had seen them busily going back and forth across the harbour with the morning commuter traffic while we waited for quarantine to give the all clear for passengers to disembark. The ferry terminal is one of the nicest buildings we saw in Auckland so it was a good opportunity to photograph that as well.

Diamond Princess, Auckland.
Diamond Princess, Auckland.

It was nice to be able to walk straight off the ship and into the city centre.
It was nice to be able to walk straight off the ship and into the city centre.

The Overseas Passenger Terminal in Auckland
The Overseas Passenger Terminal in Auckland is designed to resemble a ship.

This is the grandest building we saw in Auckland.
This is the grandest building we saw in Auckland.

The Sky Tower is the tallest building in Auckland.
The Sky Tower is the tallest building in Auckland.

A short trip across the harbour is Devonport. We didn’t have a lot of time to spend there, We strolled the main street and the esplanade where we enjoyed watching some birds being fed, mostly gulls. Devonport is also the home of the Royal New Zealand Navy and the base was at the other end of the esplanade so we walked as far as we could and turned back.

Back in the city we went to look at the Britomart Building which is Auckland’s transport hub. We went inside to look at the station and I managed to take a couple of pictures. Naomi did not fare as well. She reached the platform and a zealous employee would not let her take photos claiming that the flash would dazzle the driver. She would not listen to Naomi who was trying to tell her that she only intended to photograph a stationary train and as it is a dead end station the driver would be at the other end of the train anyway. I turned my flash off and took mine from half way up the escalators.

Inside the railway station.
Inside the railway station.

The Britomart Building, Auckand's Transport hub.
The Britomart Building, Auckland’s Transport hub.

The other thing that we really wanted to do in Auckland that day was to visit the Sky Tower so next we set off to find it. It was quite a long walk through the main streets which were so busy they reminded me more and more of Sydney. We found the Sky Tower and worked our way through the waiting line and finally got up to the top of the tower where we could see the city below us. At the Sky Tower you can experience walking around the outer parapet of the tower in a full body harness or indulging in the Kiwi passion for jumping off things at the SkyJump. We didn’t fancy either option and were quite happy with the Observation Decks.  Naomi pointed out a park that she thought she remembered visiting before and we both took a lot of pictures of the city, the harbour and the two cruise ships way down below us. After that we went back down in the elevator to take a look at the casino. I only stayed for a short time but Naomi wanted to stay and use up the last of her New Zealand dollars so we parted ways. I wanted to find a place with free wi-fi so I could download emails and read any important messages so I made my way back to a cafe near the terminal. The route I took was not particularly scenic and it was hot so I did not end up taking many pictures.

View from the tower across the harbour.
View from the tower across the harbour.

Auckland Town Hall from above.
Auckland Town Hall from above.

We did make sure that we got one more New Zealand ice cream before going back on board. As always we wished that we could have spent more time exploring the city. Later, as we sailed out of the harbour, the passengers on Diamond Princess lined the decks to wave while our passengers waved back.  Not long after that the ship slowed to a halt. We wondered why and realised that we were waiting for several yachts sailing in the harbour to get out of our way. This took some time and eventually the Captain gave them a blast of the horn to let them know we were waiting.

Passengers on Diamond Princess waving goodbye to us.
Passengers on Diamond Princess waving goodbye to us.

The view from our cabin as we left Auckland.
The view from our cabin as we left Auckland.

At the Captain’s Q & A one passenger asked about that incident and it turned out that the yachts had been participating in a race and were reluctant to give up their positions just because a giant cruise ship wanted to leave the harbour. Apparently the “steam must give way to sail” rule does not normally apply in harbours only on the open sea but on this occasion there was little choice but to wait. I believe the Pilot from Auckland was asked to get them to move in the end. It was rather funny and that was the only time we really heard the ship’s horn sounding that I can recall.

These yachts were too busy racing to give way to us.
These yachts were too busy racing to give way to us.

In my next and possibly last post about our holiday I’ll show you a couple of parts of the ship we haven’t covered and also feature pictures I took at the Ice Show. As always I’ve included some links at the end of the post if you’d like to learn more about some of the things I’ve mentioned.

 

 

Further Information

Barnes Dance crossings. – http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/page/auckland-pedestrians-begin-%26%23039%3Bbarnes-dance%26%23039%3B

Royal New Zealand Navy – http://navy.mil.nz/ayn/dnb/default.htm

Britomart – http://www.aucklandnz.com/discover/central-auckland/britomart

Sky City Attractions – https://www.skycityauckland.co.nz/attractions/

 

A Rainy Tuesday in Tauranga

Here is another installment in the story of our cruise holiday.

It was raining when we left Napier and unfortunately the wet weather followed us. When we arrived in Tauranga the following morning it was still raining steadily and did not look like letting up. A lot of people went off on tours to Rotorua from Tauranga and I think others went to see places associated with the “Lord of the Rings” films. We were going to stay in the town. Tauranga seems to be quite a large place.  The area where we were berthed was a different neighbourhood from the city centre and had the weather not been so bad we would have explored that area firstand caught a local bus to the city centre later on.

Tauranga from ship
The weather in Tauranga did not look promising.

Instead we caught a shuttle bus to the city centre and despite the poor weather Naomi and I tried to see as much as we could on foot. We had a look around the shops and visited an arts and crafts store on the waterfront where we saw several things we liked but which were too bulky to bring home.  We had planned to do a self guided walk of the town after lunch  to see some of the older buildings and parks but the rain set in so badly that after a short time we gave it up. It was just too wet.

We did manage a walk by the sea.
We did manage a walk by the sea.

However, our day in Tauranga was not a total loss. We were walking along the waterfront in a light drizzle when I spotted a group of sculptures  that caught my interest.

Hairy Maclary sculpture at Tauranga.
Hairy Maclary sculptures at Tauranga.

I called Naomi to come and see. It was a group of dogs who had a cat bailed up on a pole.  These turned out to be characters from the Hairy Maclary stories. The author of these children’s stories, Lynley Dodd, came from the Tauranga area. I don’t often get excited by sculptures but these delightful animals made our visit to Tauranga worthwhile. For those who are not familiar with the Hairy Maclary stories, and I wasn’t although I had heard the name, there is a link at the end of this post.

We ended up catching the bus back to the ship earlier than we’d have liked to and we will have to return to Tauranga one day to explore it properly.

Tauranga was just too wet.
Tauranga was just too wet.

 

HairyMaclary.jpg
By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1945430

http://www.hairymaclary.com/

http://tauranga.kete.net.nz/tauranga_local_history/topics/show/1410-30-years-of-hairy-maclary