RDP: Dinkum

Dinky-Di Aussie English

Although you don’t hear it as much now the expression “Fair Dinkum” is one that most older Aussies know, even transplanted ones like me. Well, I have been here more than fifty years now.

"Dundee Outback Hat"
Crocodile Dundee photo Miller Hats, Flickr

Every country has its own slang words and expressions and often we use them without thinking how strange they probably sound to people from other parts of the world. My understanding of “dinkum” is that it means something is the real deal, for example, Crocodile Dundee was meant to represent a dinkum Aussie bloke.

An Aussie would say “Fair dinkum” to reinforce that what he/she was telling you was the truth or by changing the inflection use it as a question. “Fair dinkum?” (Is that true?”)

aussie mousepad//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A long time ago I read a book called “They’re a Weird Mob”. It’s the story of an Italian journalist who is sent to Australia to write articles for an Italian magazine about Australia. Nino, the protagonist, thinks he speaks very good English but when he arrives in Sydney he finds he can hardly understand a word anyone is saying to him. Taking a job as a builders labourer he makes friends and gradually learns to think and speak like an Aussie. The author was, in fact, an Australian by the name of John O’Grady who wrote it in 1957. The book was made into a movie in 1966. Here’s a scene. Of course, it looks very dated now.

While I don’t entirely agree with O’Grady that migrants should forget their own culture and embrace that of their new home I did like the book very much. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts Naomi and I worked with many Europeans who came to Australia around the time that the book was written. I believe that our culture has benefited from them bringing some of theirs with them. It’s why we have a wine industry, restaurants serving food from all around the world and colourful fairs and festivals to enjoy. Those people’s children who were born in Australia and their grandchildren are as Australian as any of us.

I think that movies, television and social media have homogenised our language. Young people in Britain, Australia and the USA use more of the same words and expressions. Only the accents differ. I can’t help feeling that’s a little sad because I rather like “strine”.

https://www.readings.com.au/review/text-classics-they-re-a-weird-mob-by-nino-culotta

http://www.strine.org.uk/Hist.html

Snapshot Sunday: The Cricket World Cup

It’s hard to believe that it is four years since the men’s Cricket World Cup was held in Australia and New Zealand. Although David was sick as the tournament began I was able to attend a match in Hobart and eagerly watched the matches in other states and in New Zealand on TV. This time around it is being held in England and Wales and I have subscribed to a sports channel for a month so I can watch it. I watch a game most evenings even if Australia is not playing; might as well get my money’s worth. As the matches start in the early evening our time and go on till 2 or 3 am I don’t always stay for the end, there are handy replays the next day. The format of the tournament is a bit different from the last time and I have rather missed seeing Scotland, Ireland, the Netherlands, and Zimbabwe although Afghanistan and Bangla Desh are participating. As it is summer in England it is, of course, raining a lot and several matches have been completely rained out which is a pity as it may affect the outcome. In the event of a washout, teams are awarded a point each. Australia has been lucky not to have had a match washed out so far. It is a shame for the fans at the ground who sit in the rain all day hoping for some cricket until the officials finally decide it is too late to play.

My photos are from matches that I attended at Blundstone Arena in Hobart in the past. I haven’t been to a match in a couple of years now and don’t know if I will ever be able to attend another.

The Wooden Boat Festival 2019

Here is a more cheery post than I’ve done recently. Today is the first day of the Wooden Boat Festival in Hobart. It is only on once every two years so I didn’t want to miss it. As I was not sure if the bus would be running from Geeveston I opted to stay an extra day with Matt and Ally and go from their place leaving Matt to doggy sit Cindy.

I got a ride to town with Ally who had to work and arrived around 11:30am. Of course, as it was the first day, not all the boats had arrived and many were making their way into the harbour when I arrived. The tall ships that are usually on display were not due until the afternoon and unfortunately, I was not able to stay to see them.

There were still a lot of very nice ones to see though. Some were quite old but a lot of the ones that I saw were built in the last forty years. I’m sorry but I have a hard time thinking of something from the 1990s as old.

I walked around for a couple of hours taking photos of the ones that I liked best. It was already quite busy although still easy to get a seat in the food area where I stopped to get a baked potato for lunch.  At this point, I thought I should check on Cindy and messaged Matt. He said that she had been howling a lot and of course I immediately felt guilty for leaving her and cut my visit short.

I did manage to take more than 50 photos though. Here are some of them.

https://www.australianwoodenboatfestival.com.au/

A Photo A Week Challenge: Public Transportation

Public Transport

How could I resist joining in this challenge? The only local public transport we have around here is the bus but as a non driver I’ve used plenty of public transport while living in Adelaide and of course public transport is usually the easiest way to get around when you are visiting a large city.Here are some ways of getting around in Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart.

Public transport, Kings Cross Sydney 2012
Public transport, Kings Cross Sydney 2012

Destination Board at Sydney Central Station March 2018

A privately owned fast ferry in Sydney Harbour

Narrabeen – One of the larger ferries used for trips to Manly.

Trains at Southern Cross Station
Trains at Southern Cross Station (formerly Spencer St) Melbourne 2014.

Swanston Street Melbourne October 2014.

In Adelaide the old Glenelg tram line has been extended.

Sydney's Light Rail
Travelling on Sydney’s Light Rail System.

Bus arriving at the interchange at Glenorchy near Hobart.

Snapshot Sunday – Flying Scotsman

The Flying Scotsman in Australia 1988

I recently watched a program on television about Flying Scotsman being returned to service after a 10 year break. I saw the locomotive in 1988 when she was brought to Australia for our Bicentennial celebrations. Back then she was in her LNER livery with the number 4472. Now she is in British Rail livery with  the number 60103 and smoke deflectors added.

This locomotive has appeared in different forms during her lifetime but I have to admit that for me apple green and 4472 are the real Flying Scotsman.

http://blog.nrm.org.uk/many-guises-of-flying-scotsman/
http://www.flyingscotsman.org.uk/gallery/

Flying Scotsman 2016

'Flying Scotsman' travelling past Ewood Bridge.jpg
By Brent James PinderOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Test Match

It didn’t seem much like summer on the first day of the Test Match between Australia and South Africa. The sky was overcast and there was no sign that the sun might appear any time soon.  In fact there had been dire predictions that up to four days of the five-day match could be washed out.

Nevertheless I decided to buy a ticket for Day One and hoped that at least part of the day would be dry. I have a 100mm-300mm zoom lens for my camera which I have hardly used and I was looking forward to trying it out.

I was lucky enough to get a ride to Hobart with a friend that morning so I was there in good time and arrived at Blundstone Arena in Bellerive before the gates opened. This is my favourite time to be at the cricket, first thing in the morning on the first day of a Test Match because you can see the two teams warming up before the formalities begin.

Blundstone Arena under a cloudy sky.
Blundstone Arena under a cloudy sky.

At the ground

It always looks rather chaotic to me. The Australian team are a tangle of arms and legs as they run, skip and do stretches in one part of the ground while the South Africans  seem to he having an enjoyable time kicking a soccer ball around in another. In the middle of the ground the ground staff hover with coverings for the wicket in case it starts to rain and nearby the Channel 9 commentators are doing their pitch report.

 

I don’t recognise many of the players. Hashim Amla is the only South African I’m sure about and even some of the newer Australian players I’m not too familiar with. Two Australian players are in the team for the first time but at least I can recognise them because they are training in their brand new baggy green caps instead of the usual baseball cap. In these situations I generally opt to take as many photos as I can knowing that I will need to edit them later and I can check then to get names of anyone I haven’t recognised.

Note*: I know this blog gets a few visitors from South Africa so please accept my apologies if I have mis-identified any South African players and feel free to correct me.

I do recognise a lot of the commentators. Most of the Channel 9 team have been working at the station for years and all of them are former players. I also spot a former South African player, Shaun Pollock, doing commentary for his national television station.

After the coin toss to see who will bat first, the ” Welcome to Country” by the local indigenous community and  the anthems play begins with Australia batting first. What a disaster that turned out to be as wickets are lost immediately with the opening batsmen getting out for one run each. In fact the whole morning is like that with  the batsmen falling instead of the expected rain.

At the lunch break the ground is filled with the Milo Into Cricket kids playing multiple games of cricket while the ground staff and their tractor also reappear in case of rain. There was a light sprinkle that sent the players off for about ten minutes but not the downpour everyone had been predicting

The Australians lasted for less than an hour after the lunch break before they were all out for 85, over half of those runs made by the Captain, Steve Smith, who ran out of partners in the end and was left unbeaten on 48. After a short break for the pitch to be rolled the South African innings commenced. The Australians who were now fielding received plenty of “advice” from the small but vocal crowd. Bellerive is a small ground and as Test Matches are not accompanied by constant rock music and other distractions it is easy to hear the hecklers. There was support too of course, whistles and cheers for the few boundaries and the usual chorus of “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, Oi, Oi, Oi.” coming mainly from the wet area where some fans had their first beer soon after 9am.

End of Day One

I took a lot of photos but by 3pm I was feeling rather cold and as I didn’t want to miss the bus home to Geeveston I left. Of course as soon as I did the Australians took four wickets but they still ended day one badly behind. On the shuttle bus that took us back to the city the consensus seemed to be that we were rubbish but everyone had enjoyed their day at the cricket anyway.

The Result

For those who want to know what happened the rest of the match went like this:

Day  One: Australia all out for 85. South Africa lose 4 wickets by close of play.

Day Two: It rained all day and there was no play whatsoever.

Day Three: South Africa regrouped and built up a big lead requiring Australia to make 241 runs just to make South Africa bat again. They are all out for 326 At the end of Day 3: Australia had lost two wickets.

Day Four: Australia was unable to make enough runs being all out for 161. South Africa won by an innings and 80 runs.

Day Five: Not required. Australian players, coaches and selectors tearing their hair out trying to work out how to improve before the next Test Match in Adelaide which starts on 24 November.

 

I took far too many photos to put in this post but if you would like to see more head over to my Flickr photo stream where I have a cricket album to see the best ones, well the ones I liked best anyway. As an exercise in photography I think it was a worthwhile day. I got used to handling my big lens and most of the photos in this post were taken with it on maximum distance. I cropped most of them and in most cases the results were acceptable. It was also a good opportunity to practice sports photography. I found that I could focus and press the shutter faster. Some photos were too blurry to be useful but as I took over a hundred during the course of the day I did expect that some would be no good. I probably missed more close up shots because I didn’t feel comfortable taking a photo if the person was looking at me. Allyson is much better at that type of photography than I am. To end this post I’m going to share a few more of the photos that she took at the Michael Clarke book signing the day before the Test Match began.

Snapshot Sunday – Number 96

Australians of a certain age may recognise this block of flats in Sydney as the location of popular TV series "Number 96"
Australians of a certain age may recognise this block of flats in Sydney as the location of popular TV series “Number 96”

While we were in Sydney in March my sister wanted to find the location of the apartment building used for the Australian television show “Number 96” which ran from 1972 – 77.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068114/?ref_=ttpl_ql

When we were teenagers this was the show that everyone talked about at school and at work as it was quite daring for the time. I never watched it myself but Naomi did and said that she liked it because it was often funny and compared to the TV dramas of today she felt the characters were more like ordinary people.

The show was set in Paddington, an inner city suburb of Sydney but this building is actually in the adjacent suburb of Woolhara. Naomi knew the name of the street but not the exact location so we set out to find it. We took a taxi and as luck would have it the taxi driver was a man of around our own age who also remembered the show and he and Naomi had a good chat about what they remembered of the characters and although he didn’t know the exact location of the building either he recognised it when he saw it.

It was not the easiest building to photograph on a sunny morning, this was the best of four pictures I took and incidentally the last one I took with my Nikon Coolpix L120 as I broke it later that day.