All The Fun Of The Fair: The Huon Show 2018

I haven’t been able to visit the Huon Show for several years and this year I really wanted to go. I was considering catching the bus to Ranelagh where the show is held when Ally called me and said that she and Matt wanted to go too. Could they come and stay with me on Friday night? Of course, I said yes. Saturday morning came and the weather was bright.  We set off early to be sure of getting a park close to the Showgrounds. Ranelagh is just outside of Huonville so we were there in less than half an hour.

Alpaca at the Huon Show
I love Alpacas.

We all wanted to see the animals more than anything else and we spotted the Alpaca enclosure as soon as we came through the gate. There are several breeders in the area and some others had come from other parts of the state to show off their animals.

Kids and calves

I also particularly wanted to see the cows this year. The reason for that is that I have been reading about the issue of de-horning cows in “Chronicles of an Anglo Swiss”  this week. The Swiss are having a vote on whether this practice should be continued. I do see the odd cow near my house but I wanted to see if the practice was widespread in Tasmania. Well, I saw several breeds of cows, Jerseys, Herefords, Friesian etc and nary a horn between the lot of them I’m afraid. I decided to look it up and found in the RSPCA knowledge base a document that says that it is legal to de-horn cattle in every state and territory in Australia.

This has to be the largest cow I’ve ever seen.

https://kb.rspca.org.au/is-dehorning-of-cattle-legal_274.html

https://www.ava.com.au/policy/84-dehorning-cattle

There are some guidelines about what age and how this should be done and apparently it is recommended that a procedure called disbudding be used instead.  Disbudding is the removal of horns before they attach to the skull but I wish it wasn’t done at all. At least the Swiss cows get a referendum to support their cause.

Popular with the children.

We went to see the dog judging. It’s a small dog show compared to a city show but it’s always fun to see the dogs. I find dog show people are a breed of their own too.

Golden Retrievers in the judging ring.
Bedlington Terrier. I had to look this up.
A group of dogs with their owners.

On the main arena, the Tasmanian Light Horse Society was giving a demonstration of riding and training exercises that the troops would have done. Of course, we stopped to watch this for a while and to look at the Draught Horses in their pens nearby. There was some show jumping too but I had not brought my long lens so I could not photograph that well.

A riding demonstration in WWI uniform.
Two of the horses in the riding demonstration.
Meeting the horses
Draught Horse
The Draught horses were popular with the crowds too.

We saw goats and poultry but missed the sheep who were penned in an area of deep shade. Good for the sheep as it was warm but not very interesting to photograph.

When I saw this guy I just thought of ZZ Top
Feeding goat.
This bird was a prize winner and I think she knew it.
Wyandotte, an American breed.
I am not sure if this is another Wyandotte. They come in different colours

There was wood chopping, which I forgot to photograph and wood carving with a chainsaw. There were carnival rides, sideshows, and Showbags.  There were vintage machinery and farm equipment, handicrafts and afternoon teas.

To finish off here are a few more photos. WordPress is not letting me do galleries today or it could be this computer because I can usually do them on the laptop. The computer is seven years old so I forgive it.

Working on a carving.
Chainsaw carving of a wombat.
A Seahorse carved with a chainsaw.
Another restored vehicle from the vintage machinery club.
Not sure what this if for but it makes a lot of noise.
The Laughing Clowns game.
Lucky tickets at the sideshows.
A carnival worker
Lethal Weapon Ride
Energy Storm ride
I think the recorded voice in these things is the same one I remember from my teens.

 

RDP #72 Cat

Tales of a Cat Slave

I’ve had both cats and dogs as pets and while I often see my dogs as four legged people when I look at my cats I see the wild creature in them. They may have chosen to live with us but they are not like us.

Watch a cat stalking a bird or even a bug, they are as focussed on their target as if their lives depended on catching their own food. Even Polly who was not allowed outside the house for the first year or two of her life knows how to stalk prey. It’s all instinct.

Cat’s are not needy. Some cats like to cuddle and some don’t. Some love to hang out with you and some are much more independent. One ginger male we had used to follow us to the railway station when we went to work meowing piteously all the way, often he’d be on or near the platform on the opposite side of the tracks in the afternoon when we came home. I don’t know how he learned that but he did.

Most of our previous cats have liked to sit on laps or sleep on the bed.  Polly has never wanted to sleep in the bedroom let alone on the bed. She has never been a lap cat either, at least not with me. I was very surprised that over the last week or two she has suddenly decided to curl up on my lap in the evenings but that may have as much to do with the fact that I was sitting in the armchair nearest to the heater as love. She’s sleeping on that chair herself right now and I am banished to the couch.

Polly taking it easy on the armchair.

I’m always amused by the saying “Dogs have owners, cats have staff.” They demand their food, usually at a set time.They demand your food and may help themselves from your plate if you don’t stop them. They will wake you up with a pat on the face if they want breakfast, even at 3 am and  they make you get up and let them in or out fifteen times in an evening sometimes coming in one door and going straight out another. If they want to sit on your lap you must accommodate them no matter what you might be doing. Never mind that newspaper you were trying to read or your knitting. Once they are settled you don’t get up out of your chair for fear of disturbing them. I am sure TV remotes were invented by a cat owner.

Then there is Naomi’s cat Tigerwoods who thinks it is amusing to jump into your chair the minute you get out of it. I’ve nearly sat on him more than once. I think that he does that just for a joke but often cats will do something annoying because they want attention and have worked out what action is likely to get it.

Despite their bossy ways I can’t help feeling very privileged when a cat likes me though.

image cat and kitten on couch
Someone is watching me!

 

 

Happy Birthday to all the Horses

In the Southern Hemisphere all horses celebrate their birthday on 1 August. Here are a few horse photos to celebrate.


Hello Molly
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Molly, who belonged to my neighbour looking over our back fence.

Draught horse, Geeveston 2010
Draught horse, Geeveston 2010

The Waler horse is the type of horse used by the Light Horsemen

Riders forming up before the start of the Anzac March.
The gang from Heritage Horse Drawn Carriages.
The gang from Heritage Horse Drawn Carriages.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-01/horses-celebrate-their-birthday-photo-gallery/5638032

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Any Animal (No Birds)

Pets and a Potaroo

I did a spot of house sitting  several years ago for friends who had a hobby farm near Franklin. The little dog I only minded once and I have forgotten her name. The cat Chloe was very friendly and would sleep on the bed with me and pat my face when she wanted me to get up. Sadly both went over the Rainbow Bridge some years ago now.

I have forgotten the name of this little dog who was owned by a friend I used to house sit for.
Chloe was also owned by my friend.

Oliver was an orphan lamb who was hand reared. He was named Oliver because he always wanted some more. The goats as far as I know did not have names.

Oliver, a pet lamb.
Nameless goats

The Potaroo, one of many that visited the property was not a pet, they were considered pesky freeloaders. My friends grew vegetables and had strawberries and raspberries and these were all in netted enclosures. I had to make certain that I shut the doors firmly after I went inside them to water or pick anything. Still although they are cheeky these little wallaby like animals are rather cute.

Cheeky potaroo

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Wildlife

Wildlife

I was wondering what I was going to do for this challenge. Most of the wildlife I photograph seems to be birds lately. I did capture a picture of this lizard in my back garden a few months ago.

A scaly visitor

Here are a group of Japanese Macaques who live in an enclosure in City Park in Launceston. The babies were cute but hard to photograph as they were too busy playing to pose.

This is a potaroo, an Australian native marsupial animal that is related to the wallaby. When I was house sitting for a friend some years ago lots of them would come in to her garden to steal her vegetables and raspberry plants. I had to make sure that I secured the gates when I went to water the plants in the hothouse and the fenced in areas where she grew everything. The potaroos were not tame but they were unafraid of humans as you can see I could get quite close to this one.

image potaroo
A cheeky little potaroo
Potaroos foraging, Franklin Tasmania 2012

Polly Five Years On

A Facebook memory reminder today was a photo of Polly from five years ago. We found Polly on the 6th of January 2013 when she was probably about 8 weeks old. It’s been fascinating to see how she’s grown in confidence over five years although she still does not like strangers and hides if anyone comes to the house only making an exception for Naomi who she has decided to be friends with. I started to blog the same year that Polly arrived so her life with me has been well documented. Here is a look back.

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