The Model Train Show Again

I thought that I wasn’t going to get to the Hobart Model Train Show this year. Naomi and I had planned to go on Saturday and then my real estate agent rang to see if he could show the house that day. When we have a viewing I need to be at home so that I can take Cindy for a walk while the potential buyers are there. As there are few buses on Saturdays and they were coming mid-morning my chances of going out were nil. I had arranged to have groceries delivered Sunday, a day I rarely go out, but luckily I was able to switch my delivery to Saturday afternoon and free up Sunday for the outing.

As I’ve been going to the Model Train Show every year for a long time now I have seen a lot of the displays before. However, as I only see them once a year that doesn’t really worry me. I tried to look for some new angles to photograph the trains from.

Naomi and I both like the British themed layouts because they remind us of our early childhood. We didn’t travel on trains too often but the town scenes always seem vaguely familiar to me.

Terrace houses in a British themed layout.

We both liked this layout with its rows of terrace houses and the painted backboard which gave the scene more depth.

The roundhouse at Richmond Bridge

We also enjoyed talking to some of the operators. As we love miniature things as well as trains we appreciated the detail in some of the scenes. I think that some of the people who build model railways are very creative and imaginative. They create little scenes which if you spot them may tell a story or make you laugh. One gentleman told us how he’d cut down a model figure to sit inside a car but the figure had folded arms so he didn’t look like he was driving it. People mentioned this so he made up a story about how one of the locals liked to walk his dog off-leash but the dog was badly behaved and would run on the road. The man in the car knew this so he was sitting with his arms folded patiently waiting for the dog to get off the road. It was true. I saw the dog myself.

Richmond Bridge

There were a few layouts based on places in Tasmania and South Australia. The Gawler layout that I wrote about last year was there again and we especially enjoyed seeing that because it was a place we knew quite well at one time and the Redhen railcars were part of our lives for a long time from our early teens through to our thirties when we were cleaning them at the old railcar depot. I do hope someone models that one day. I’d like to see our old workplace in miniature.

We stopped to say hello to Peter Fielding who as usual had brought a small but detailed display. This year he’d brought “The Poo Train” which showed trains that carried manure. Peter likes to educate and entertain the children but poo was a bit much for us so we just had a quick chat before moving on.

As usual, the Transport Museum volunteers had fired up a locomotive to give rides in the yard. We didn’t go for a ride this year because we’ve done it many times but we did stop to take some photos before we left.

We Did It! — Maybe?

Well here is some good news. The web harvesting site Tygpress has been temporarily closed down.

This, That, and The Other

I just went to tygpress.com to see if Carol Anne’s (Therapy Bits) posts we’re still showing up. In her post she asked, “If you can check on tygpress for therapy bits and let me know, I’d appreciate it!”

So I did. I typed “tygpress.com” in my browser and this is what came up: EF7872CD-EC88-4411-8AC7-2D3CE09DCC66Wow! Tygpress.com is “temporarily out of service.” And the out-of-service message even included an apology: “We are extremely sorry to the content owners.” Well I’ll be damned.

We did it. We shut down Tygpress!

Well, at least temporarily! How great is that?

Congratulations to all of you who made your voices heard, who posted complaints to DigitalOcean and to WordPress, who completed the forms, and who used this badge:Tygpress not authorizedAll of your efforts seem to have worked. Woo hoo!

Now we just need to mobilize like this and maybe Trump will be a one-term President!

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Feel Free to Use this Badge

A site called Tygpress.com has been harvesting blogs from many WordPress bloggers and publishing them on the site. There is very little that can be done to stop this sort of behaviour but blogger Fandango has come up with this badge which can be inserted into a post to make it less attractive to these people. Fandango is happy to share the badge with anyone who wants to use it.

This, That, and The Other

With all of the unauthorized harvesting of our posts that is going on at tygpress.com and seemingly not much that can be done to stop it, I created this badge that I will attach to all of my blog posts going forward.EDC343BA-4E67-4F78-BDFB-02FE6D5C0A26Please feel free to grab this image and post it on your blog. By doing so, this image should show up on your posts that have been stolen by tygpress.

You’re welcome.

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RDP: Dinkum

Dinky-Di Aussie English

Although you don’t hear it as much now the expression “Fair Dinkum” is one that most older Aussies know, even transplanted ones like me. Well, I have been here more than fifty years now.

"Dundee Outback Hat"
Crocodile Dundee photo Miller Hats, Flickr

Every country has its own slang words and expressions and often we use them without thinking how strange they probably sound to people from other parts of the world. My understanding of “dinkum” is that it means something is the real deal, for example, Crocodile Dundee was meant to represent a dinkum Aussie bloke.

An Aussie would say “Fair dinkum” to reinforce that what he/she was telling you was the truth or by changing the inflection use it as a question. “Fair dinkum?” (Is that true?”)

aussie mousepad//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

A long time ago I read a book called “They’re a Weird Mob”. It’s the story of an Italian journalist who is sent to Australia to write articles for an Italian magazine about Australia. Nino, the protagonist, thinks he speaks very good English but when he arrives in Sydney he finds he can hardly understand a word anyone is saying to him. Taking a job as a builders labourer he makes friends and gradually learns to think and speak like an Aussie. The author was, in fact, an Australian by the name of John O’Grady who wrote it in 1957. The book was made into a movie in 1966. Here’s a scene. Of course, it looks very dated now.

While I don’t entirely agree with O’Grady that migrants should forget their own culture and embrace that of their new home I did like the book very much. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts Naomi and I worked with many Europeans who came to Australia around the time that the book was written. I believe that our culture has benefited from them bringing some of theirs with them. It’s why we have a wine industry, restaurants serving food from all around the world and colourful fairs and festivals to enjoy. Those people’s children who were born in Australia and their grandchildren are as Australian as any of us.

I think that movies, television and social media have homogenised our language. Young people in Britain, Australia and the USA use more of the same words and expressions. Only the accents differ. I can’t help feeling that’s a little sad because I rather like “strine”.

https://www.readings.com.au/review/text-classics-they-re-a-weird-mob-by-nino-culotta

http://www.strine.org.uk/Hist.html

RDP: Odor

Something Smells Bad

If you like the way something smells you might say it has a pleasant scent, fragrance or even odor but normally odor, or as we spell it odour, does not have pleasant associations.

When I first put my house on the market the agent said: “You probably don’t notice it but the house smells a little ‘doggy’.”

Cindy in the back room.

My pets live inside and nothing is going to change that but after that, I became paranoid about bad odours. Even though I cleaned the carpets, opened windows and burned scented candles I was never sure if the house smelled OK. It smelled fine to me but how did I know that wasn’t just because I was used to it?

What made it worse was that one particular family who came to see the house obviously didn’t like animals. They arrived early and I had not had a chance to leave the house. I always take Cindy for a walk while the house is being viewed. Of course, she rushed up to their car to say hello and I think that put them off. Apparently one of them had asthma or allergies. I probably should not have warned the agent that Polly was hiding somewhere in the house and he should not leave the front or back door open. As Polly is an indoor cat and doesn’t like strangers I worry about her escaping if someone startles her. As long as she can hide under a bed she’s fine.

They hated the house complaining about the smell and even that one of them could not breathe. The agent said they were fussy people and had not liked anything he showed them but I still felt bad.

Smells are a big deal in real estate. I’m sure you’ve read those articles about having the scent of baking or coffee brewing in the house when there is a viewing. I don’t do that. It seems a bit contrived and actually, not everyone likes those smells. Naomi hates the smell of coffee for example. I try not to use any scents that are too strong or too sickly sweet because not everyone likes those either. Usually, I just open all the windows that actually open for a few hours, unless the weather is really bad and if I do use any kind of scent it will be something that is not too overpowering, citrus is a favourite.

A well-deserved cup of coffee.

This Saturday I have people coming to look at the house again so Friday will be a day of preparing the house and making it look and smell as nice as possible. Wish me luck!

Share Your World 2019: 29 July

QUESTIONS.   

(the last two are courtesy of Teresa of The Haunted Wordsmith)
  1. Is it wrong to sell store-bought pastries at a bake sale?

It’s probably not in the spirit of the thing but these days there are more working parents and surely it’s better to bring something you bought than not participate at all. I think mine may be the last generation who volunteers to make home-baked goodies for stalls. However, bringing store-bought and passing it off as your own is not on as far as I’m concerned.

Red Velvet cupcakes (from a packet).
  • Have you ever interacted with the police?

If by interacted you mean been arrested no I have not. I have interacted with the police over other matters eg.

  • Neighbourhood Watch
  • Minor road accidents
  • Police making enquiries about neighbourhood events
  • Being given a ride home by a policeman after my sister and I missed the last bus home from a concert when we were teenagers.
  • What will you remember most about this past year (this question will show up again, in late December, just FYI)

The bushfires last summer, and if you ask me again in December my answer is likely to be the same unless something really out of the ordinary happens. I will never forget those weeks.

Fire reports from SE Tasmania 2019//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

  • Is it better to have fungus on your toes, your tongue, or your pizza?

Pizza, mushrooms are a fungus, right?

  • What is one slang word that makes your skin crawl?

There is nothing like a question of this type to empty my head of any ideas at all. There are words that I really dislike not so much because they are bad words but because they are also ugly words. Like the one that starts with C and ends with T.

On the subject of slang I looked up a list of millennial slang words and I doubt that I could even communicate with a millennial. It’s like they speak a different language.

Something I’m grateful for this week

The daffodils are starting to flower.