Armchair Travel:Oatlands Tasmania


Oatlands, as you know, is where Naomi lives and I’ve visited the town often over the years.

Oatlands is one of Tasmania’s oldest settlements, it was on the main route between Hobart and Launceston and features many buildings built from convict made bricks. In fact, it is said that Oatlands has more sandstone heritage buildings than any town in Australia.

Until recently Oatlands was a well kept secret, it is off the highway and people travelling between Hobart and Launceston often by passed the town. Now it is becoming a popular tourist destination and Naomi tells me that the RV camping area is almost always full now, even in winter, unheard of years ago when I was a regular visitor. Oatlands gets really cold in winter.

So here are some of our photos of Oatlands and some links to other posts we’ve written about it. I especially recommend reading Naomi’s post “A Little Bit of Hollywood in Oatlands” for some great photos of the town and the actors in the film “The Nightingale”

High Street, Oatlands, Tasmania
Re-enactment, Oatlands Spring Fair 2010.
Re-enactment, Oatlands Spring Fair 2010.
image Georgian cottages Oatlands TAS
Convict era cottages in Oatlands, Tasmania
Uniting Church Oatlands. Photo by Naomi
The Callington Mill dominates the landscape.
Windmill at Oatlands
Anglican Church at sunset. photo by Naomi
Lake Dulverton

Some of our posts about Oatlands:

https://two-sisters.blog/2017/06/09/my-walk-through-callington-park-and-the-oatlands-mill/

https://two-sisters.blog/2017/06/01/a-little-bit-of-hollywood-in-oatlands/

https://two-sisters.blog/2014/06/05/photo-thursday-callington-mill-oatlands-tasmania/

https://two-sisters.blog/2017/07/05/rosehaven-update-from-oatlands/

https://two-sisters.blog/2017/12/24/oatlands-xmas-pageant/

Taswegian1957

I was born in England in 1957 and lived there until our family came to Australia in 1966. I grew up in Adelaide, South Australia, where I met and married my husband David. We came together over a mutual love of trains. Both of us worked for the railways for many years, his job was with Australian National Railways, while I spent 12 years working for the STA, later TransAdelaide the Adelaide city transit system. After leaving that job I worked in hospitality until 2008. We moved to Tasmania in 2002 to live in the beautiful Huon Valley. In 2015 David became ill and passed away in October of that year. I currently co-write two blogs on WordPress.com with my sister Naomi. Our doll blog "Dolls, Dolls, Dolls", and "Our Other Blog" which is about everything else but with a focus on photographs and places in Tasmania. In November 2019 I began a new life in the house that Naomi and I intend to make our retirement home at Sisters Beach in Tasmania's northwest. My current housemates are Cindy, my 14-year-old Staffy-Lab X dog and Polly the world's most unsociable cat who is seven.

4 comments

  1. My home town since 2003. It has changed so much in the last few years. I will be moving soon. One reason is because of the redevelopments and another is because it will become just too busy and noisy for me. I am retiring to Sisters Beach soon so I will try to get some photos showing the biggest changes. Tourists will love all of these things and for them Oatlands is definitely worth a visit and a stay either at the caravan park or the B&Bs etc. I am happy for the people of Oatlands of course as business will thrive but sad it has changed so much. I will miss the way it was. Same thing happened to my old Adelaide suburb Semaphore SA.

    Like

  2. Nice pictures. The place looks both, very English and very Netherland πŸ˜€ Because of the windmill and other architecture, combined with the landscape.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The style of most of the old buildings is Georgian. Tasmania was the second colony settled after NSW and the architecture reflects styles in Britain at the time. The windmill is also a British style. I’ve seen photos of very similar ones in Norfolk. I always wanted to visit The Netherlands to see the windmills, canals and tulips.

      Liked by 1 person

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