RDP: Snow


Snow Days

People are often surprised to learn that it snows in Australia. It’s not like the snowfalls you get in Europe or the USA but parts of Australia get snow in winter. We even have ski resorts in the mountainous parts of NSW and Victoria.

As I am from England I saw snow as a child but then we moved to South Australia where once in a blue moon there might be a little snow on top of Mt Lofty (727 metres above sea level) On these occasions it would make the news and anyone who was able would rush up to the summit to see it before it melted. You had to be quick!

Consequently, David grew up never having seen snow. Then we went overseas. His first experience of snow was in Siberia.

David in Irkutsk, Siberia
Wooden house near Lake Baikal, Siberia 1990

Here in Tasmania, the most southerly state in Australia, it snows a little more often than it did in South Australia but rarely enough for me to still get excited about it.

People who have lived here all their lives tell me that winters used to be colder here and that once Mount Wellington (1,271 metres above sea level) had a covering of snow it would remain that way for several weeks but now the snow may only last a few days. I’m blaming climate change.

Snow is most likely to fall in Tasmania between June and October. The first few years we were here it tended to be more towards September-October but the last few big falls we’ve had have been in June or July. Oatlands, where Naomi lives, gets a bit of snow in winter. I remember the first time I was there house sitting for her in July 2008 and it started to snow heavily one day. It was about minus three degrees outside but I was so excited that I put a pair of track pants over my jeans, an extra pair of socks and gloves and went out to take photos in the middle of the snowstorm.

Snow in Oatlands

I saw one other lunatic out doing the same thing. The next day the snow was still on the ground so I managed to get a few more photos but by mid-morning it was all gone.

As Geeveston is 60km south of Hobart it’s not unusual for the hills around the area to get snow in winter although it doesn’t usually last long here either unless it is very cold. A few of my friends who live on properties out of town get snow in their gardens. However, I’ve only had snow in my garden two or three times in nearly 17 years of living here which is somewhat disappointing to me.  Last year a friend took me out to see the snow just outside the town which was fun.

View from the front porch. 2015

I probably would not like it if we had so much snow that we had to shovel our way out. It would make getting around for me harder than it already is but it is pretty to see once in a while.

Snow in Geeveston 2017

Author: Taswegian1957

Born in England in 1957 my family came to Australia in 1966. I grew up in Adelaide, South Australia, where I met and married my husband David. We came together over a mutual love of trains. Both of us worked for the railways for many years, his job was with Australian National Railways, while I spent 12 years working for the STA, later TransAdelaide the Adelaide city transit system. After leaving that job I worked in hospitality until 2008. We moved to Tasmania in 2002 to live in the beautiful Huon Valley. David passed away in 2015 and I'm here on my own now but I have Cindy the dog and Polly the cat to keep me company. I currently co-write two Wordpress blogswith my sister Naomi. Our doll blog "Dolls, Dolls, Dolls", and a "Our Other Blog" which is about everything else but with a focus on photographs and places in Tasmania.

One thought on “RDP: Snow”

  1. I was born and raised in Florida and still get excited in anticipation of snow. We have had big snowfalls here in Virginia…the kind you have go shovel to get out. But as they say here, “If you don’t like the weather, wait a minute.”

    Liked by 1 person

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