Christmas Comes To Geeveston


The Geeveston Chrismas Parade is always held on a Friday evening early in December. It’s very much a community affair. It is organised by the local volunteer fire brigade and the participants are local schools, churches, clubs and businesses.

The day of the parade started out wet and I hoped that it would improve before 6:30pm when it was due to start. Although it is summer it is not unusual for it to be cold and wet on the night of the Christmas Parade.

As the Op Shop was putting a float in the parade we decided to keep the shop open late so that people could come in and do a bit of Christmas shopping before it began.  I don’t usually work there on Fridays but Karen who works with me  Mondays and was organising the float had volunteered to take over from the day time staff so I said I would go too.

The parade was to form up in School Road starting from the Fire Station. Between five and six o’clock our float and two or three others arrived in the school car park to be decorated. We had a few shoppers and lots of children running in and out. While Karen’s husband Ian and the older kids worked on the trailer that was to be our float Karen dressed her youngest son as Santa Claus.  Soon after that it was time to form up for the parade and Karen and Jane, another of the volunteers got in the trailer with all the kids. I declined the offer to ride on the float with them as I wanted to take photos.Instead I rode down to the fire station in the car with Ian and then walked around to Church Street to wait for the parade to start.

Santa gets into costume.
Santa gets into costume.
Preparing the float
Preparing the float
The Op Shop Float
The Op Shop Float leaving the school
The firies prepare.
The firies prepare.
An army band leads the parade.
An army band leads the parade.

An army band headed the parade to provide some music. The local chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism “The Canton of Lightwood” came along in their costumes, there were fire engines of course, bicycles, motorised mini cars and even a ride on lawnmower.

the members of the Canton of Lightwood.
The members of the Canton of Lightwood.

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After Santa Claus had been escorted to Heritage Park by the firies there was entertainment in the form of music from the brass band, a jumping castle and a sausage sizzle. Our group didn’t stay late because although the rain had stayed away it was quite chilly and the adults at least were happy to pack up the trailer and head for home. Later that evening we learned that the float had been awarded the prize for the best motorised float which pleased and surprised us as I don’t think anyone had given a thought to trying to win a prize.  We just wanted to be involved.imgp4853

And that’s how we do Christmas in Geeveston.

Author: Taswegian1957

Born in England in 1957 my family came to Australia in 1966. I grew up in Adelaide, South Australia, where I met and married my husband David. We came together over a mutual love of trains. Both of us worked for the railways for many years, his job was with Australian National Railways, while I spent 12 years working for the STA, later TransAdelaide the Adelaide city transit system. After leaving that job I worked in hospitality until 2008. We moved to Tasmania in 2002 to live in the beautiful Huon Valley. David passed away in 2015 and I'm here on my own now but I have Cindy the dog and Polly the cat to keep me company. I currently co-write two Wordpress blogswith my sister Naomi. Our doll blog "Dolls, Dolls, Dolls", and a "Our Other Blog" which is about everything else but with a focus on photographs and places in Tasmania.

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