Cee’s Compose Yourself Photo Challenge – #20 Review and Practice


Looking Back

This fortnight is devoted to reviewing what we have learned in Challenges One to Nineteen.

I decided to take a few new pictures to share to illustrate some of the subjects we have tackled.

Week #3 – Always take more than one photo.

Even when I was still using film and had to be careful about how many pictures I took I always took more than one shot of anything that I really liked. I did that not only to make sure I got a useable photo but to look at it from different angles. Now that I have a digital camera I always take multiple photos, even a simple task like taking pictures of the new pergola can turn into six or eight photos.

If you look at these photos you will also see that they contain a lot of vertical lines, the upright posts on the pergola and the fence and horizontal lines, the cross pieces of the pergola, the gutter and the weatherboard the house is made of. The second photo has the path as a leading line to draw your eyes onwards.

Week #5 – Leading Lines

Here is another photo with leading lines. The timber path leads your eyes on to the pergola and then continues down to the bottom of the garden. There is quite a lot of geometry going on here with the square shape of the pergola, rectangles and the triangle made by the open ladder.

Pergola still under construction.
Pergola still under construction.

 

Week #11 – Centrepoint

Here is a photo of Polly which I cropped to a more or less square with her eyes and nose  in the centre square of the grid. Below it is the original photo.

Polly centre of frame.
Polly centre of frame.
Test shot of Polly
Test shot of Polly

 

Week #15 – Cropping Tips

I’m a compulsive cropper. I probably started cropping pictures when  I started to learn scrapbooking. My instructor would show the group how a picture could be improved by cropping parts of it to make it fit more cohesively into the design of the page. Once I started using digital cameras I discovered editing software and found that by cropping I could turn a photo that I would normally had thrown away into one that I liked or a good one into a better one. I frequently crop photos to get rid of distracting objects. In the case of Living Barbie and Skipper the background was fine but I thought that the cropped photo made a better portrait.

Conclusion

Some of the things we have covered in the challenge so far are things that I was conscious of and thought about before I took a photo. Others were new ideas to me which I will try to consider in future. Sometimes you don’t have time to think, you just have to take the picture especially with action photos and wildlife but even then if you know the rules you may use some of them instinctively.

 

Taswegian1957

I was born in England in 1957 and lived there until our family came to Australia in 1966. I grew up in Adelaide, South Australia, where I met and married my husband David. We came together over a mutual love of trains. Both of us worked for the railways for many years, his job was with Australian National Railways, while I spent 12 years working for the STA, later TransAdelaide the Adelaide city transit system. After leaving that job I worked in hospitality until 2008. We moved to Tasmania in 2002 to live in the beautiful Huon Valley. In 2015 David became ill and passed away in October of that year. I currently co-write two blogs on WordPress.com with my sister Naomi. Our doll blog "Dolls, Dolls, Dolls", and "Our Other Blog" which is about everything else but with a focus on photographs and places in Tasmania. In November 2019 I began a new life in the house that Naomi and I intend to make our retirement home at Sisters Beach in Tasmania's northwest. My current housemates are Cindy, my 14-year-old Staffy-Lab X dog and Polly the world's most unsociable cat who is seven.

11 comments

  1. Great job demonstrating some of the topics we’ve covered! I find it inspiring that you were able to do this without leaving your house. This means I have no excuses!

    Polly is so cute. I love the markings on her ears.

    Like

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