Cee’s Compose Yourself Photo Challenge -Week#11 Centrepoint


Everybody Sometimes Breaks The Rules

Once I learned something about the Rule of Thirds I tried to use it when composing photos however sometimes the full frontal approach works for me. I used it a lot when I was taking photos of steam trains. In fact David and I had a name for it which we lifted from a caption in a railway book. “Yes. The engine was stationary.” which we used when we stood directly in front of the locomotive and took a shot of it. I don’t often get a chance to do that these days. Here is an old one I scanned, one of hundreds that David and I took.

NSW 3801 hauling the Bicentennial Train in 1988.
NSW 3801 hauling the Bicentennial Train in 1988.

In the 1990s I worked at the Adelaide rail yards and sometimes when I was there on a weekend and it was quiet I would take some photographs. This set of diesel railcars had the nickname of “Superchook” but you’d have to be a South Australian railfan to think that was funny.

modified SAR redhen railcar "Super Chook"
modified SAR redhen railcar “Super Chook”

I still like to photograph locomotives head on. Here’s one I took at the railway museum in Hobart.

Tasmanian Railways M5 at the Tasmanian Transport Museum.
Tasmanian Railways M5 at the Tasmanian Transport Museum.

Today I went into the back garden to take a few summer pictures so here are a couple of “rule breakers ” from that. I bought some new plants with a gift voucher I had for the local hardware store.  I have not potted them properly yet as I need to get someone to give me a lift home with a heavy bag of potting soil so these plants are just placed in pots to keep them from being blown over and damaged for now. As they are purely record shots I wanted them in the centre of the picture. The third photo, a record shot of my Japanese Maple tree doesn’t work well as a photo and I knew it wouldn’t when I took it even though I cropped it to make the tree a bit more dominant. It was late afternoon, well 6pm actually, and the shadows are too long. There is too much distracting background behind the pretty leaves. If I’d been taking a serious photo maybe I should have squatted and tried to make the background all sky or all fence.

Federation daisies and a pink pelargonium.
Federation daisies and a pink pelargonium.
English Lavender
English Lavender

 

Japanese Maple
Japanese Maple

Taswegian1957

I was born in England in 1957 and lived there until our family came to Australia in 1966. I grew up in Adelaide, South Australia, where I met and married my husband David. We came together over a mutual love of trains. Both of us worked for the railways for many years, his job was with Australian National Railways, while I spent 12 years working for the STA, later TransAdelaide the Adelaide city transit system. After leaving that job I worked in hospitality until 2008. We moved to Tasmania in 2002 to live in the beautiful Huon Valley. In 2015 David became ill and passed away in October of that year. I currently co-write two blogs on WordPress.com with my sister Naomi. Our doll blog "Dolls, Dolls, Dolls", and "Our Other Blog" which is about everything else but with a focus on photographs and places in Tasmania. In November 2019 I began a new life in the house that Naomi and I intend to make our retirement home at Sisters Beach in Tasmania's northwest. My current housemates are Cindy, my 14-year-old Staffy-Lab X dog and Polly the world's most unsociable cat who is seven.

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